Houselessness and Affordable Housing Accomplishments




Sam has always supported strong funding measures for affordable housing. In 2001, as Vera’s chief of staff, he helped deliver unanimous council support for the work to create a regional affordable housing fund through Salem, where it was blocked by Republicans.


The City was sounding the alarm for almost twenty years, when no one was listening. The housing bond was a huge, multi-year effort, but it wasn’t until the housing crisis really started hitting home--as rents skyrocketed--that housing became the public’s top concern for the first time.




2009


In 2009, as the Great Recession was at its toughest, Adams had cut the City’s budget $8.9 million, with 59% from administrative costs, added $2.4 to the “rainy day” general fund contingency, and increased housing assistance programs 30%.


“This recession has impacted Portlanders in many ways: higher unemployment, lower home values, and less economic security... this budget focuses on those basic needs, striving to keep all Portlanders safe and secure in their jobs, homes, and neighborhoods... increase funding to human services programs such as housing assistance and homelessness.” Mayor Sam Adams 2009 Proposed Budget Message.

Houselessness and Affordable Housing Related Services:


  • Funds the Police Service Coordination Team, or SCT ($2.6 million). The SCT provides chronic drug and drug related property crime offenders, one to three day periods of detention with access to treatment options.

  • Fully funds CHIERS ($432,180), a roving response van with emergency medical technicians and fully funds the Hooper Sobering Station.

  • Increases the City's commitment to housing assistance programs by 30%, including: > Ongoing funding for Resource Access Center operations ($1 million) > One-time bridge funding to maintain housing support and shelter services ($5.8 million in General Fund and federal stimulus funding) > One-time funding to expand rent assistance, housing, and economic opportunity programs ($3.1 million in General fund and federal stimulus funding)





2010


“Commissioner Nick Fish, who oversees the parks and housing bureaus, was thrilled that the mayor found an additional $3.8 million for shelter beds, warming centers and other services for the homeless.” Oregonian, 2010.

“My priorities outlined in this budget remain focused on... supporting the most vulnerable in our community and keeping all Portlanders safe and secure in their jobs, homes, and neighborhoods... increase funding to help those most in need through mental health programs and housing assistance.” Mayor Sam Adams Budget 2010 Priorities.

Cut ongoing General Fund spending by $5.3 million, with a mix of administrative efficiencies and reductions in programs and services.


Adams’ budget protected core city services while also helping those most in need during this economic crisis:


  • Fully funds the CHIERS program and supports Multnomah County's sobering station

  • Funds a prostitution rehabilitation and transition effort

  • Continues the City's Service Coordination Team, which has shown positive results in reducing recidivism among those who commit quality of life crimes, at a reduced level

  • Invests $1.0 million to increase shelter bed capacity, especially for the high-demand women's shelter facilities

  • Allocates $2.5 million for the Portland Housing Bureau to meet increased demand for shelter services, rent assistance, and access services

  • Invests $540,000 to increase capacity to provide mental health services





2011


“Adams' budget continues to support the most vulnerable in our community through investments in housing, homelessness prevention, mental health, and addiction services... Help those hit hardest by the recession and provide support to the most vulnerable in our community...” Mayor Sam Adams Budget, 2011.

Helping Those Hit Hardest by the Recession: This budget helped those most in need during the economic crisis, which had been brutal for far too many Portlanders. The adopted budget invested General Fund resources in housing, including $4.9 million for shelter services, rent assistance, and access services, including:


  • $1.7 million to continue critical emergency and shelter services

  • $1.9 million to continue rent assistance to prevent homelessness and rapidly rehouse those that have become homeless

  • Nearly $500,000 for housing access services

  • $150,000 for an in-depth housing strategy to support the Portland Plan

  • $250,000 to help homeowners avoid foreclosure and keep their homes

  • $390,000 to support new programming at the Bud Clark Commons housing resource access center, which opened at the end of FY 2010-11.

  • Provides $600,000 in ongoing operational funding for the City-County Crisis Assessment and Treatment Center, which will serve individuals experiencing a mental health crisis.

  • Budgets over $3 million in comprehensive responses to the addiction and mental health issues that impact the livability of our community and the work of our Police staff.

  • Continues funding for the Service Coordination Team ($1.9 million)

  • Continues funding for the CHIERS van and Hooper sobering station ($1 million)

  • Extends the Central Precinct mental health staff ride along program ($100,000)

  • Grants $65,000 for the Outside In needle exchange harm reduction program.




2012


Cut $14.7 million from ongoing General Fund services, but the Budget included protections our city's most vulnerable citizens and keeping our safety net, the budget includes one-time funding for shelter services, rent assistance, and housing access services:


  • $150,000 in programs to combat human trafficking.

  • Continues funding for the Service Coordination Team ($1.9 million)

  • Continues funding for the CHIERS van and Hooper sobering station ($1 million)

  • $1.7 million to continue critical emergency and shelter services

  • $1.9 million to continue rent assistance to prevent homelessness and rapidly rehouse those that have become homeless

  • Nearly $500,000 for housing access services

  • $250,000 to help homeowners avoid foreclosure and keep their homes

  • $390,000 to support new programming at the Bud Clark Commons housing resource access center, which opened at the end of FY 2010-11.

  • Provides $600,000 in ongoing operational funding for the City-County Crisis Assessment and Treatment Center, which will serve individuals experiencing a mental health crisis.


In the Bureau of Development Services (BDS), one-time funding to help prevent the deterioration of existing housing and contribute to safe and healthy Portland neighborhoods is preserved:


  • $310,392 of funding will support four positions in the Improved Neighborhood Inspections, Enhanced Rental Inspections, and Extremely Distressed Properties Enforcement Programs.


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